Landscape Performance News

Case Study Investigation (CSI): Apply Now for 2017

The Landscape Architecture Foundation is now accepting applications for its 2017 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program. Deadlines Nov 18 and Dec 2. CSI matches LAF-funded student-faculty research teams with leading practitioners to document the benefits of exemplary high-performing landscape projects and produce Case Study Briefs for the Landscape Performance Series.

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LPS Wins Top ASLA Communications Award

The Landscape Performance Series has been recognized with the 2015 Award of Excellence in Communications from the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). This is the highest honor in the ASLA Professional Awards, which recognize top public, commercial, residential, institutional, planning, communications, and research projects from across the U.S. and around the world. 

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Case Study Investigation (CSI): Apply Now for 2016

The Landscape Architecture Foundation is now accepting applications for its 2016 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program. Deadlines Oct 16 and Dec 4. CSI matches LAF-funded student-faculty research teams with leading practitioners to document the benefits of exemplary high-performing landscape projects and produce Case Study Briefs for the Landscape Performance Series.

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LPS Watch List: August 2015

Each month we bring you a roundup of landscape performance news worth sharing – the latest in research, tools, and innovative thinking related to the measurable environmental, social, and economic benefits of sustainable landscapes. Several of this month’s articles highlight that the relationship between landscape elements and benefits is often more complex and nuanced than we think.

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A Digital Data Library for Wildlife Infrastructure

by Amanda Kronk, SWA Group

Wildlife infrastructure exists as a framework of migration courses and habitation patterns that are inextricably linked to critical human infrastructure. At any given time, there are countless “rivers of wildlife” migrating locally and regionally above and within the world we know. In conjunction with increasingly fragile climatic conditions, urban development is drastically disrupting this framework. Wildlife is essentially pushed to the urban periphery, as increasing habitat fragmentation results in detrimental conditions for species migration.

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Help build the LPS: Find out how to submit a case study and other ways to contribute.